>Better Late Than Never

>I know that there are many, many, people much better at this than I. I knew that when I started this BLOG! But it’s time to bring things together with the new year and set a schedule for writing…and get some needed feedback, if there is any, from those who are also concerned about the future of the Classical Saxophone.

I’ve been making a mental list of the things that need to be done for students and teachers:
1) High School and College Students, look ahead and make sure you want to be a classical saxophone player. If you do, then make plans for forming a saxophone quartet. Find out more about the music, listen to recordings and talk to groups that are out there. Also, start going to recitals by saxophone quartets and talk to people who attend about what they heard, and what they liked and perhaps didn’t like. After you’ve formed your group, GET OUT THERE AND PLAY FOR PEOPLE OUTSIDE THE CAMPUS ENVIRONMENT. Don’t just perform for other musicians and worse, other saxophone players! Yes it’s helpful to get feedback from your colleagues, but if we ever hope for classical saxophone to be a part of the serious music world, we need to get out there and create audiences.
2) Teachers – High School and College – please make the saxophone quartet something more than an addition to the curriculum. The quartet is the only way for most classical saxophone players to make their future. Sure, there will be exceptions, but most players will not be hired to perform in solo recitals and concerto performances. It hasn’t happened over the last fifty years, and it’s not likely to happen any time soon. The quartet is critical and what we need is Critical Mass!
Teachers, particularly at the college level, can make the biggest difference. Schools like Northwestern University, University of Michigan, Michigan State, University of Southern California, Eastman School of Music, and others have produced award winning, wonderfully, talented quartets. After they graduate, they perform for a while and then many of these groups fade away. WHY? As long the classical music business is fueled by groups that are represented by Artist Managers, the saxophone quartet will not be included in the mix! At this point, there is only one saxophone represented by a New York agency, and that’s the New Century Saxophone Quartet. Good for them. But for all the other talented young quartets, we need more than that. Think about it.
More later. Please chime in and respond.